What is CPD?

Changes to CPD requirements in light of COVID-19

We know that social distancing measures relating to COVID-19 are making it difficult to attend CPD events in person. In response to this, we have introduced a policy to enable Costs Lawyers to obtain all of their CPD points for 2020 from remote learning activities (e-learning) if need be.

23 March 2020

Find out more in our full policy statement.

Costs Lawyers must ensure that their expertise remains relevant and current throughout their professional careers. One way of achieving this is to carry out continuing professional development, or CPD. The term CPD refers to the learning activities that a practitioner engages in following entry into the profession.

For Costs Lawyers, CPD might involve learning activities aimed at:

  • refreshing or updating existing knowledge about costs law and practice
  • developing practical skills, such as advanced advocacy techniques
  • acquiring new abilities to facilitate a changed role or promotion, such as people management
  • understanding changes to legal or regulatory requirements that impact the profession, such as data protection laws

CPD requirements

Costs Lawyers must complete 12 hours of CPD, equating to 12 CPD points, each practising year. Currently, those CPD hours must be derived from certain categories of activities, as outlined in the CPD Rules and guidance. There is a cap on the number of points available for each category.

Note: our CPD Rules are currently under consultation. We anticipate new rules being introduced in 2020, to apply from the start of the 2021 practising year. The main change will be to increase flexibility by removing the activity categories and points caps. Costs Lawyers will need to reflect on the objectives and outcomes of their CPD. We will keep this page updated with developments.

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CPD Rules 342.57 KB

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CPD Guidance 485.78 KB

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CPD Record 1.94 MB

    FAQs

    It is important to carry out sufficient CPD activities each year to achieve 12 points. We can only issue a practising certificate to a Costs Lawyer who has less than 12 points in exceptional circumstances (for example, long term ill-health). 

    You will need to submit evidence of any exceptional circumstances with your application for a practising certificate.

    If you had a period of ill-health, you will need to provide a medical note or letter from a doctor or other healthcare practitioner.

    If you were absent from work for an extended period, you will need to provide a letter from your employer or organisation confirming the period of absence.

    Where you have been on extended leave for part of the year, you will still need to attain one CPD point for each month (or part month) during which you were practising.  

    There is still time to undertake CPD during December. We would encourage you to consider any in-house training available as well as relevant webinars, which can often be completed from your desk or at home.

    If you intend to complete CPD in late November or December, after submitting your practising certificate application, you should note this on your CPD record as usual. Please ensure the CPD activity is booked before it is entered on your CPD record (for example, by reserving a place at a conference, accepting an invitation to a seminar or registering for a webinar).

    If the CPD activity is not in fact undertaken for any reason, you will need to choose another CPD activity and let us know about the change to your CPD record. Please remember that CPD records are subject to audit.

    We recognise that some Costs Lawyers might be furloughed or otherwise not able to work for certain periods in 2020 due to COVID-19. The requirement to attain 12 CPD points for the year will be reduced by one CPD point for each full month that you’re not able to work. For example, if you were furloughed for two full months, you would only need to attain 10 CPD points in 2020. We will ask for evidence of your time away from work (such as a letter from your employer) to ensure that everyone is treated fairly.